Osuna Colegiata

Seville, beautiful and diverse

In 1731, a group of boys would walk through the streets singing the rosary “more for childish entertainment than true devotion”. Gradually, more people joined them until the Confraternity of the Servites was founded. The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows is the architectural gem of the Confraternity.

The Barefoot Carmelite Convent of the Conception was founded in 1577 by Francisco Álvarez de Bohórquez and his wife, Catalina de Coria. The convent was opened in 1580.

Like other parishes in Seville, its origin dates back to the Reconquest of the town. It is located on the same site as a Roman temple, on which a Visigothic church and later a mosque were built. It is a Gothic-Mudejar type of church, although it was modified during the 17th and 18th centuries.

The chapel is a building of Mudejar origin. Built in the 15th century, it is Mudejar in style and has a single nave. Its interior is a beautiful example of popular Mudejar architecture with a characteristic wooden roof with an image of San Diego, built by Castillo Lastrucci in the 20th century. The end façade is from the first quarter of the 16th century.

The church is located in the high quarter and was built and inaugurated in 1969. The main façade has an access porch with a triple portico of semicircular arches, and above the central arch, there is a ceramic panel with the image of the saint after whom the church is named, San José, who appears with the infant Jesus in his arms.

This church belonged to a Franciscan monastery. It was built in the first half of the 17th century and underwent various alterations in later times, reaching our days greatly transformed.

The Santa María la Mayor Parish Church is a monumental compound with three naves separated by pillars and a square main chapel. It was designed by the architect Diego Antonio Díaz who built it in the second half of the 18th century.